** As published on AESC Bluesteps

Business leaders have always been scrutinized for their decision making. In 1914, Henry Ford was both denounced as a fool and praised for doubling wages of factory employees from $2.34 to $5 per day. In 1987, Merck & Company decided to give away a cure for river blindness for free, an unfathomable choice for most pharmaceuticals, because they recognized the cost of the drug would be too high for impoverished international markets.

** As published on AESC Bluesteps

In 2017, it seems like everything is being measured and quantified. Over time, this trend has spread to people-centric industries like executive search. Like it or not, the use of personality assessments – and other pre-employment testing – is alive and well as companies are hiring employees from the entry level to the executive level. I’m often asked by clients and candidates alike, “what role should personality testing play in the hiring process?” My response usually begins with the words “be careful…”

** As published on AESC Bluesteps

Perfect timing! Here I was thinking about the topic of ageism, when my wife suggested that we watch “The Intern.” I was not familiar with the story, but I quickly noted the relevance. The movie is about a 70-year-old (Robert De Niro) intern working at a start-up clothing retailer in Brooklyn. Assigned to a role under the friendly, but overly-busy CEO (Anne Hathaway), De Niro played a highly professional intern with 40-years of executive experience. Due to his noticeably calm and thoughtful demeanor compared to many others in the business, Anne Hathaway’s character eventually decides to reassign her intern because he is too “observant.”

Globalization has shrunk the world in which we live, and broad, international experience has been in increasingly high demand for our manufacturing clients around the world.  Never has talent been more mobile, and never has the mobility of talent been more critical for business success.  Executives interested in advancement to the pinnacle of their fields need to seek out international opportunities – or at least not shy from them when they present themselves.

** As published in Workforce

To be a ‘TOP’ performer, issues of integrity and business ethics become far more important than a job, even a CEO title.

As a new executive, trust your sense of fairness, know right from wrong, and care for others.
After landing a new executive-level position, it’s time to think about the best strategy for getting the work done. Joining an organization is a critical time to assess and be assessed that all candidates should be actively concerned with.

TRANSEARCH International’s Managing Director, John Ryan, chaired a fireside chat in partnership with AESC and the IE Business School, an internationally recognized graduate school located in Madrid, Spain. AESC is the Association of Executive Search and Leadership Consultants. The fireside chat focused on executive search, how it works, emerging trends, and an insider’s perspective on how to effectively gain visibility within the search community.

Executive integration is a strategy for aligning or synchronizing newly hired individuals – or current leaders transitioning to new roles – with the culture, team, and expectations of an existing group of people. We should all advocate for a strong integration process, designed to ensure that individuals or groups hit the ground running. And running fast!

** As published on AESC Bluesteps

Sending that first message to someone is a critical part of the job seeking process. The subject line needs to give the reader an interest in learning more and a desire to read the message. Candidates should consider: What is their mission? What is the most efficient way to achieve that mission? For many years, executives have tried to create the perfect formula for a message subject line, but there is no single solution. Three things to consider in creating an effective e-mail subject line are: creativity, relevance, and enticement.